Nature Study for City Dwellers

Copyright Catherine Levison.  Used with permission. All rights reserved. http://charlottemasoneducation.com


Even in the city, children should get their knowledge of nature first hand and get into the habit of being in touch with nature.Here are some simple nature and science ideas for city (and rural) families to share together:

1) Press and mount flowers on cardboard. Write the names of the flowers, and where and when you found them. I recently saw a photo-album used to store pressed flowers. Having a field guide to identify flowers and flowering trees is very helpful.

2) Keep a nature calendar. A calendar devoted to nature observation could be kept with simple entries on when the leaves first fell or the fruit tree in your yard first ripened for the year.

3) Leaf identification. Children should know the leaves of their neighborhood. For example they can begin to notice that some leaves are heart shaped, some are divided, and some fall off in the winter.

4) Give children a pocket compass, a magnifying glass and possibly a microscope. We like using the magnifying glass better. Buy the best magnifying glass or microscope you can afford and check it at the store — they seem to vary in how they focus.

5) Learn about the wind. A weather vane mounted on the housetop or porch railing is not only a decorative object but also a learning tool. Charlotte Mason said to teach children to notice winds. Tell the children that the wind is named by what direction it comes from; for example, if someone is a Mexican because they were born in Mexico, they don’t become a Canadian when they visit Canada.

6) Even children in the city can observe natural animal life. City dwellers can try to feed and observe city birds such as sparrows. Children can place a caterpillar in a box with a netting over it and watch it spin. Keeping an ant farm is fun and educational.

7) Swamps and ponds are an excellent resource for science learning. Have children go to the pond, gather some frogs’ eggs, and place them in a large glass jar. After the tadpoles begin to form legs, take them back and release them at the pond.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
–Catherine Levison is a popular speaker to parenting and educational audiences throughout the U.S.A. and Canada. She’s also the mother of five children, a grandmother, and the author of the book, A Charlotte Mason Education: A How-To Manual, the sequel, More Charlotte Mason Education, and A Literary Education: An Annotated Book List. She resides with her family in the Seattle/Tacoma area. Visit Catherine online at: http://CharlotteMasonEducation.comCatherine Levison’s books can be browsed and purchased from Amazon.com at the following links.A Charlotte Mason Education
http://amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1891400169/simplepleasuresp/

More Charlotte Mason Education
http://amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1891400177/simplepleasuresp/

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